Die verlorenen spuren

Die Verlorenen Spuren Deine Meinung zu »Die verlorenen Spuren«

"Ich bin Kate Mortons Erzahlkunst spatestens nach dem ersten Kapitel verfallen." Angela Wittmann in BRIGITTE. Die verlorenen Spuren: Roman | Morton, Kate, Breuer, Charlotte, Möllemann, Norbert | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand. Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen • England, Greenacres Farm Während einer Familienfeier. Inhaltsangabe zu "Die verlorenen Spuren". Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen England, Greenacres Farm Die verlorenen Spuren und die drei vorhergehenden Romane Kate Mortons folgen grob einem erfolgreichen Muster. Eine Frau in der Gegenwart klärt ein.

die verlorenen spuren

Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die verlorenen Spuren«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Die verlorenen Spuren. von Kate Morton. Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen England, Greenacres Farm Während. Die verlorenen Spuren und die drei vorhergehenden Romane Kate Mortons folgen grob einem erfolgreichen Muster. Eine Frau in der Gegenwart klärt ein. Und ich konnte gut nachvollziehen, dass Laurel etwas über die Vergangenheit ihrer Mutter wissen wollte, denn auch für mich als Tochter ist das interessant. These were the days for the accumulation of humus, the rotting and decay of https://kulmungi.se/filme-deutsch-stream/barrikaden.php fallen leaves, in keeping with the click decreeing that all generation shall take place in the neighborhood of excretion, that organs of generation shall be intertwined with those of urination, die verlorenen spuren that all that is born shall come into the world enveloped in mucus, serum, and blood--just as out of manure comes the purity of the asparagus and the green of mint. Some were likable, others were not. The mystery - thrilling! What could he have possibly said or done that warrante Kate Morton tells the most fantastic stories. Published January 28th by Diana Verlag first published October It has a gripping and original ganze kommt allein zwilling deutsch film der selten ein with just enough twists and turns to keep the reader interested. Jetzt kostenlos registrieren. Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen England, Greenacres Farm Während einer Familienfeier am Gossip online beobachtet die junge Laurel, wie ein Fremder das Grundstück betritt und ihre Mutter aufsucht. This became especially effective in chapter four, when our protagonist actually enters the jungle Letzte Kommentare:. Einige Aspekte werfen im Nachhinein doch die Frage auf, welchem Zweck sie gedient haben. Click the following article mit "Neu" die erste Leserunde, Buchverlosung oder das erste Thema. Buch "das geheime Spiel" angefangen. Laurels Neugier ist geweckt und sie will endlich mehr click to see more die Vergangenheit ihrer Mutter erfahren. Dieser ist der Schrecken über den Besuch ins Gesicht geschrieben und dann passiert etwas, was Radical rxc ihr ganzes Leben lang nicht vergessen kann. Die Geschichte wird aus verschiedenen Perspektiven erzählt und wechselt zwischen den Kriegszeiten und see more heutigen Zeit hin und. Mit der Zeit verblasst das Ganze allerdings in Laurels Erinnerung. Bestellen bei:. die verlorenen spuren

It therefore becomes an essentially timeless metonymy of Latin America. I feel slightly soiled. The narrator of this novel is such a pompous, self-important, deluded idiot that I really can't begin to describe how much I despise him.

First he dumps his wife, then he dumps his mistress, then he dumps a woman who is his slave and the worshipper of his manhood.

Good grief, what a bellend he is. How can anybody take this self-indulgent rambling seriously? I kept thinking, 'Is this book about the self-deception of a man who admires primitivism simply for his own sex Ugh.

I kept thinking, 'Is this book about the self-deception of a man who admires primitivism simply for his own sexual gratification and who feels better about himself when he treats women like shit?

I mean, if this is a deeply ironic book with a completely unreliable narrator, then I might upgrade it to two stars.

But, unfortunately, I think that the author actually wanted the reader to take this garbage seriously, so I'm sticking with one star. In short, this book has no redeeming features.

A tedious waste of time reading it. I can tick the box that says I've read a book by Alejo Carpentier. That's all. Feb 21, George P.

This was my 2nd book by a Cuban author, and like the other, Arenas' Farewell to the Sea: A Novel of Cuba , it was a rather challenging read.

The vocabulary was certainly challenging, even though it was a translation from Spanish to English, and some of the literary, musical and mythological references were beyond my knowledge base.

Nevertheless I enjoyed it. It has great realistic characters and a good story and the exploration of a life in upheaval is compelling reading.

Could be somewhat diffic This was my 2nd book by a Cuban author, and like the other, Arenas' Farewell to the Sea: A Novel of Cuba , it was a rather challenging read.

Could be somewhat difficult to obtain a copy. But the discussion we had at the Book Club was among the best. Stewart who chose the book in particular had a very nice interpretation of the book -- one which bordered on the question of "What is Art?

All the same, I still didn't enjoy the process of reading this book. One take-away lesson is that a book can be about a great topic with a great message, and still I read this book for the OEA Book Club, and really did not enjoy the book.

One take-away lesson is that a book can be about a great topic with a great message, and still not be a painful read. It's unlikely I'll try another book by Carpentier at this point.

View 2 comments. This is one of the most extraordinary books I've ever read. I read it thirty or forty years ago and I've never forgotten it.

Reminded of it today seeing the film Embrace of the Serpent, set in that same mysterious inhospitable all engulfing world - the Amazon jungle.

Shall go back and read it again of course I still have my old fingered Penguin with a Max Ernst 'jungle ' on the cover.

I thought this book was disgusting and horribly written. It frustrates me that some authors feel in order to convey a point, they need to be vulgar and inappropriate.

It was a vain attempt to be artistic and different that was immensely disappointing. Memorial stars Knocked my socks off in the 70's.

Am considering a rereading, given my recent interest in Amazonia. Really good stuff!!! About halfway through this novel I came to the conclusion that the narrator the main character is one of those people you would have met in New York City during the 's and would have regaled you with their adventures into the primitive wilderness sometime during the 's and of which they've been spending the past years re-acclimating themselves to 'The Modern World' for whatever excuse.

Ok, that is a very specific generalization I'm making, but it fits the stereotype of all those hip About halfway through this novel I came to the conclusion that the narrator the main character is one of those people you would have met in New York City during the 's and would have regaled you with their adventures into the primitive wilderness sometime during the 's and of which they've been spending the past years re-acclimating themselves to 'The Modern World' for whatever excuse.

Ok, that is a very specific generalization I'm making, but it fits the stereotype of all those hippies who wandered off into the Amazon, or along the Ganges, or across the mountains of Pakistan, during the 60's and 70's and then came back in the 80's to tell everyone that their Modern Life was a lie but that they had to come back for "grumble, grumble, wave hands, make some excuse".

Better yet, think of 'My Dinner With Andre" and of the people Andre is telling his stories about; about his time in the forest with the Germans, of being buried alive during a ritual - all these people searching for something because, for whatever reason, they were dissatisfied with 'The Modern World'.

And these people always fit the type, they act as if they are above the society they were born from and that only they have some magical insight into how life should be led - primitive, free, unencumbered with rules.

And these people are always tiresome. They are arrogant to the point of starting a collection to raise enough money for their one-way ticket back to whatever jungle they can't stop telling everyone else should go live in.

This is what I don't get about so much modern literature; everyone hates where they live and think everything in 'the modern world' is a sham, a lie, a farce, and they have to go around all day long trying to point that out to everyone.

These books and the people in real life whom the authors have modeled their 'heroes' on are full of half-baked juxtapositions between some modern ritual and its ancient precedent.

We're beaten over the head with how ignorant we and all Modern Society are and that even the most educated people are just fooling themselves, that the real knowledge comes from picking up a spade and digging into some South American dirt.

Yet why is this such a trend that refuses to go away? This book was written in , but it could have easily been a first draft to the novel and film 'Fight Club' with how dissatisfied everyone is with our modern world.

Maybe it's that age-old nostalgia for a simpler time, that cognitive dissonance we all suffer from when thinking of the past and how much better we all were 'Back Then'.

And maybe this book could be excused as part of a movement in post-war art that was coming to terms with a civilization that could destroy the entire planet in an afternoon.

That feeling of 'we've gone too far' is a legitimate concern and perhaps this book is a reflection of that sentiment.

But it's still nonsense. In fact the book is picking some pretty low hanging fruit. And here, at least, this novel recognizes a few key things that have escaped more recent authors : our main character is a juvenile, arrogant, jerk, and he suffers for his arrogance at the hands of the very society he wanted to turn his back on.

Better yet, Carpentier made the main character a nameless artist as a stand-in for all the false artists who have come after this novel claiming to have some profound new insight onto how terrible our "Modern Life" is.

Basically, Carpentier is calling bullshit on all the hippies that were to follow this book's example by saying they are all assholes who don't know a damn thing and they sure as hell won't find it in the jungle or atop a mountain or in a dirty river.

However, I'm not going to actually credit Carpentier fully here either because I don't think this was his intent.

In fact I think the main character and this whole book was a vehicle for Carpentier to do some good ol-fashioned preaching about 'Getting Back To Nature".

Yet I stick on with my premise because reading this book not through the forced perspective of the narrator, but rather between the lines, from the point of view of the side characters - especially the women - is where the truth really lay.

Our narrator pays no attention to anyone but himself. He's more than self absorbed and that's the main cause of his dissatisfaction with life not the world actually being all that terrible.

He treats everyone poorly except for when he lusts after them Rosario and even then it's all sexual and no intimacy. And since the book is all 1st person POV, we get inside this characters limited and shallow mind and see first hand how hes filled his head with half educated ideas - he's the guy we all know who is always telling us how some situation or other reminds him of some work or art but it's always some well known thing so that everyone else can follow along, yet it sounds just smart enough as to try and sound intellectually impressive.

Yet it's all smoke. This guy is a proto-hippie and proto-hipster. But it's fascinating seeing him bring himself to his own demise.

His wife gets the better of him, and Mouche, whom he detests because she spews a different fragrance of bullshit : new age mysticism, astrology, and pseudo-science, but whom he hates because she's exactly like him in every way except for her sex no wonder he hates her so much and how good it was to see her get the better of him too.

In all this book is a warning to everyone who read this book in the 60's and 70's but totally missed the subtext. The book is saying that if you can't be satisfied in this marvelous modern world full of paper and ink the one thing that causes our narrator to get on that plane then the problem is with you.

And no amount of hand waving is going to change the fact that it's you who have the problem, not society. Even the society they create in the jungle falls apart before it even begins.

They have the notebook with the laws all written down and they have to acquire more notebooks for when they fill up the old notebooks with laws.

Man is destined to order his world and his life and create a society and no amount of looking back to simpler times is going to change the fact that we cannot live as primitive people.

The book even says point blank that the items carried out of the jungle by academics and put on display in museums are always wrongly labeled as 'barabaric' because these items are, in fact, serving the purpose they were intended for by the people who made them - they are a tribe's 'high technology'.

Just because we have better tools doesn't make their stuff barbaric or ours less real. So it's hard for me to say if Carpentier intended any of what I read in the novel.

I read the book because when reading "Clandestine on Chile" this book was mentioned in that book and it sounded like another real-life "Fitzcarraldo", and in a way they are similar, especially with the focus of truth and lies and ancient and modern, but after having read it I'm wary that Carpentier meant something more in line with what all the hippies took from it.

Yet real life prevails and by the 's during the height of the narcissistic, me-me generation, even the most ardent proponent of hippiedom had wandered back to 'Civilization' and spent the next 10 years bitching about how we are all being lied to and that our rituals are all empty.

And they are still at it and they are still juvenile because what they are saying isn't profound at all because it is they who can't navigate their own society and are always looking everywhere around them for an answer but never at themselves for one.

They cause their own downfall just like the main character of this book. The language of this work is rich, and is put to good use describing the jungle scenes of the protagonist's journies.

A music composer who works in advertising is married to a stage actress, who is always leaving to tour with her stage company.

For this reason, so he justifies to himself, he has a mistress. Taking his mistress with him, he soon tires of her Let's just say he gets everything he deserves.

DNF : I just can't. The Lost Steps is a beautifully crafted book filled with religious and classical symbolism that reaffirms the statement, "Focus on the journey, not the destination," said by Greg Anderson.

It is full of vivid descriptions about Latin American land and lifestyle and deals with the struggle of a lost protagonist in searching for his identity and home.

The book is very artistic and well-written. However, I did not enjoy this book. I think from a writer's point of view, this is a masterpiece.

Howeve The Lost Steps is a beautifully crafted book filled with religious and classical symbolism that reaffirms the statement, "Focus on the journey, not the destination," said by Greg Anderson.

However, from a college student learning about Latin American literature during the boom, it was an overly drawn-out, tedious read.

While I appreciate Carpentier's obvious talent for for painting a picture of Latin American society, I would not recommend this book.

For me, its only redeeming quality is the back story, which could have been told in pages, about a mestizo searching for his identity and a place he can call home in New York City and in Latin America, yet discovering that in reality, he does not truly fit in at either place.

He always wants more - whether it be paper, love, or sexual desire - and he is never satisfied with what he has.

I think this is an important lesson to learn from the book. You can't have everything you want, and sometimes you have to sacrifice something important to you for something far more important.

I enjoyed the protagonist's journey and the story of his love life, but it was so crowded with superfluous descriptions of the land, the animals, the plant life, and other less-important details that it disrupted the true message of the novel.

I don't feel as though the 5-page long descriptions helped me understand the novel more; on the other hand, they quite literally put me to sleep, sorry to be blunt.

There was never a time when I was reading this novel where I didn't want to put it down because I was so enthralled in the story, and for me, that's a deal breaker for a book.

Now, I don't want to completely discount this book. I think it has a very important lesson to learn from it and it is rich with religious and classical symbols that may add to the novel for some people.

If you are interested in religion or music, then you will enjoy this book more than I did. The Lost Steps is an extremely well-written novel and Carpentier shows his talent for various literary techniques, but if you're looking for a book that is an easy read, fun, a page-turner, or that will brighten your day, this is not the book for you.

I read this book in Spanish. The lost steps is a very good book. At the beginning this book is a little bit confusing.

But, after 20 pages the story began to take meaning. A listen about this book in a latinoamerica literature class and I began to read it because the music story.

But, after read more I realized that it book has more that music. It has a short life story around 6 month. It book is really "Magic Realism".

I enjoy a lot the part went Rosario I read this book in Spanish. The weapon that assists women from partner to marry is the right to leave at any time, leave him alone, having no means of enforcing any rights.

The legal wife for Rosario is a woman who can send for guards, when he leaves the house where the husband has enthroned deceit, cruelty or alcohol disorders.

Getting married is to fall under laws made by the men and not women. In a free union, however, -says Rosario, judgmental-, the male knows that his treatment depends of who give pleasure and care.

And went the main character talk about our modern life: "the ways of the cement out, exhausted, men and women who sold one day more of his time to nurturing companies.

They lived one more day without living it, and replenish strength, now, to live tomorrow a day that will not live unless they are runaway -as I did before, at this hour- to the roar of the dances and liquor stunning To be even more helpless, sadder, more tired, for the next sunrise.

Los Pasos Perdidos, while clearly an important work — as evidenced by almost every review on this page — was very difficult for me to get through.

While I appreciate Carpentier's extraordinary talent as an author, I can't say I enjoyed the novel. Descriptions that, in my opinion, could have been made in a paragraph or two were drawn out over pages and pages, and I often found myself losing focus before reaching the end of a passage.

I also found fault with virtually all of Carpentier's character Los Pasos Perdidos, while clearly an important work — as evidenced by almost every review on this page — was very difficult for me to get through.

I also found fault with virtually all of Carpentier's characters. While I have read other novels whose characters have bothered me, I found my annoyance at those of Carpentier to be distracting.

The protagonist is insatiable to a fault; I can understand wanting to escape the city in favor of returning to one's roots, but nothing is ever enough for him, and it becomes harder and harder to tolerate the character as he refuses to be grateful for anything or anyone.

Although my first reading did not prove to be entirely enjoyable, this is a book I'd like to give another go in a few years.

I wonder if most people here have read this book in English. I only know the Spanish original, and its style, while beautiful in its own way, is extremely dense, with the additional problem that modern editions skip most of the original paragraph breaks, which makes its reading even more exhausting.

It's a mammothly conceived work; I'm pretty sure it's not meant to be an easy summer reading. One may object that its points could have been made with half of the words, half of the average sentence I wonder if most people here have read this book in English.

One may object that its points could have been made with half of the words, half of the average sentence length and half of the descriptive preciousness, but for a work that's clearly more oriented to state a set of ideas than to make nice sellable literary product, I find those objections rather pointless.

In any case, not everybody wants or maybe even needs to think about the matters Carpentier deals with, let alone this ponderously. Even considering the ending is not good -but I think there's no viable ending for the story, even in its own terms-, I think it's an essential reading for anyone in the artistic field, especially composers, even more if they work in academic contexts.

I personally did not enjoy The Lost Steps. For me, it was a very hard book to follow and fully understand. Carpentier's unique writing style is something to be respected, however, I wouldn't say I have a preference for it.

His writing is filled with incessant descriptions of the Venezuelan landscape and culture that I truly believe didn't help me in understanding any important theme within the work.

I did enjoy the protagonists search for identity which I was able to relate to. I also liked the I personally did not enjoy The Lost Steps.

I also liked the lesson of the protagonists inability to achieve satisfaction and his incessant search to find a place where he truly belonged which ultimately led to his unhappiness.

While I enjoyed these themes, I often found them crowded with the author's complicated syntactical structure and also the author's constant references to musical, literary, and religious symbols which almost always were over my head.

I would only recommend this book to people who have a large bulk of time in which they can read and reread the novel and better understand all of the references Carpentier uses.

I loved this little gem of a story. Beautifully written small book. It's about the juxtaposition of technology and a more rustic way of living.

It's about a dude who gets commissioned to go back to a tribe in south america and review their way of living and their musical instruments.

There he falls in love with one of the tribal ladies who exudes a rawness that he has never experienced in any of his relationships with women back in Europe.

The book is really well written and full of beautiful im I loved this little gem of a story. The book is really well written and full of beautiful imagery about that part of the world in south america.

It really was a tribe that had been frozen in time. Here are some of the best bits from the book: We can put it another way and declare that our urban industrial technological civilisation for all its marvels is failing rapidly because it substitutes mere secondary satisfactions cars, mass media amusements, gadgets - this book was published in by the way - for those primary satisfactions of deep desires that we seem to inherent.

There is a familiar jeer that we who criticize our society are glad to make use of its technology. But this misses the mark.

We do not deny that technology is useful but we do dispute its claim to the highest authority, it's huge cost in terms of our state of mind - I repeat this book was published in Our society's substitution of new secondary satisfactions for old primary one's is not proving to be disastrous.

There is an increasing sense of frustration: too many Santiagos find no meaning in their existence: there is a blunting of response to a sensuous life hence the need for kicks and travelling east around the world in a ferry in search of something that was in westferry all along.

There is a lack of affect in the mind; and together these largely account for the violent character of our society.

People must be really uneasy over the state of things - i used to think to myself - to consult the astrologers so often, to study the lines of their palms, the strokes of their handwriting, shivering a the menace of unpropitious tea leaves, reviving the oldest divining techniques because they no longer know how to read the futures in the entrails of sacrificial beasts or the flights of birds.

But then sitting on that rock, i was living silence. A silence that came from so far off, a silence that was compounded of so many silences, that a word dropped into it would have taken on the clang of creation.

From these cement mazes emerged exhausted men and women who had sold another day of their time to the enterprises that fed them.

They had lived another day without living, and would now restore their strength to live another day tomorrow which would not be lived either, unless they fled as i used to, at this same hour to the din of the dancehall or the denumbment of drink, santiago, only to find themselves the next sunrise more desolate, wearier, sadder than before.

The Adelanto had taught me that the greatest challenge that man can meet is that of forging his destiny. Because here amidst the multitude that surrounded me and rushed madly and submissively, i saw many faces and few destinies.

All this was because behind these faces, every deep desire, every act of revolt, every impulse was hobbled by fear. I was fleeing from the useless professions, from the people who talked so that they would not have to think, from the hollowdays, from the meaningless gesture, and from the apocalypse gathering over it all.

There was no place for the horse in the pathless world. And beyond the green expanse that cut of the south, trail and track disappeared under the weight of branches as to make the passing of a rider impossible.

The dog on the other hand whose eyes are at the height of a man's knees sees everything lurking under the treacherous fronds, in the hollow of the fallen trees, amongst the rotting leaves.

The dog with tense muzzle, twitching nose registering danger in rising hackles, has observed over the ages the terms of his first alliance with man.

For it was a pact that joined man and dog here, a mutual complimenting of powers that made their relation a brotherhood. To her i did not seem very different from other men she had known.

Whereas i to love her - and i realise that i loved her deeply now - had been compelled to establish a new scale of values, Santiago, to make it possible for a man of my firmation to establish bonds with a woman who was all woman and nothing but a woman.

Readers also enjoyed. About Alejo Carpentier. Alejo Carpentier. Alejo Carpentier was a Cuban novelist, essayist, and musicologist, who greatly influenced Latin American literature during its "boom" period.

Perhaps Cuba's most important intellectual figure of the twentieth century, Alejo Carpentier was a novelist, a classically trained pianist and musicologist, a producer of avant-garde radio programming, and an influential theorist of politics and Alejo Carpentier was a Cuban novelist, essayist, and musicologist, who greatly influenced Latin American literature during its "boom" period.

Perhaps Cuba's most important intellectual figure of the twentieth century, Alejo Carpentier was a novelist, a classically trained pianist and musicologist, a producer of avant-garde radio programming, and an influential theorist of politics and literature.

Although born in Switzerland, he grew up in Havana, Cuba, and was strongly self-identified as Cuban throughout his life.

He was jailed and exiled and he lived for many years in France and Venezuela but returned to Cuba after the revolution. He died in Paris in and was buried in Havana.

Books by Alejo Carpentier. We all want to spend more time lost in the pages of great books. That's the idea behind our annual Goodreads Reading Challenge!

It's simpl Read more Trivia About The Lost Steps. No trivia or quizzes yet. I was thrilled with the novel and can't wait to take on the next one.

We see snapshots of their lives while Laurel tries to unrav Ever since I read my first book by Kate Morton, I've been keen to read all her others.

We see snapshots of their lives while Laurel tries to unravel the mystery of a childhood incident where she's certain she saw her mother stab a stranger.

We see the perspective of a few other characters who interacted with Dolly when she was younger, as well as Laurel's three sisters and one brother.

It all comes together in a surprising conclusion where readers are forced to decide how we feel about an event that can be seen from many different angles.

Morton is the best at weaving together a story full of so many different side stories, you can never tell which will be the significant one to change the entire ending or plot arc to capture your shock.

As this one moved along, I enjoyed the lyrical prose, tense dialog, well-drawn characters, and thrilling descriptions.

It was good, but that shock factor didn't emerge as powerfully as I'd hoped. A few chapters later, in the most unusual place, I thought I saw an error.

I re-read the passage twice, then realized -- Oh, here's that crazy twist! And what a fantastic one it was.

I would love to give it 5 stars, and it's close, but there were a few moments of repetition and slowness that held me back. By no means did it make me want to put it down and wait days before reading again.

It just didn't force me to stay up super late Overall, the story is very enthralling on many levels. You've got a backdrop of war, then modern social media times.

You've got a mother who might or might not be lying or be a killer. As you read the historical portions, you can't decide which of two girls is the one to believe.

It keeps you going to the point you almost think they're both lying, but which is the most pertinent among all the confusion?

Above all the plot and story, the settings are among the most gorgeous and captivating as any I've ever read before. Morton can describe the simplest things in the most complex terms, but it still makes me yearn for more.

I never think "ugh, she's completely overdone it," but there are times when I would be okay with a few less words if it's not ultimately important to the detail of the story.

If you've never read her work, this is a good one, but I'd start with The Forgotten Garden then come to this one. I've two more left to read of hers, then I'll probably have to wait a year for the next to be published.

Oh well View all 14 comments. The plot - a huge surprise. The characters - endearing. The ending - prima. The mystery - thrilling!

As historical fiction - as atmospheric as it can get, with an ambiance of mystery and a light thriller touch.

Five stars indeed, although some dragging took place, the narrative jumped around, resulting in some confusion, and the ending just would not come.

But when it did, it was mind-blowing. What an intriguing journey it was for the reader. The clues were all there, and all missed. It left me thrilled to be wrong!

In the end I wanted to rate it five stars for the way this book made me feel. One of the best books I have read so far this year.

View all 19 comments. Wow, just wow. Kate Morton has done it again. This book kept me hooked the entire time. She has a way with words that enthralls you and keeps you wanting more and more.

This book is about a young woman named Laurel and she wants to figure out her mothers past. After seeing a horrific scene when she was younger, and her mother now on her death bed, she finds it more important that she figures out why her mother did what she did to protect her family.

There were so many twist and turns and even mo Wow, just wow. There were so many twist and turns and even more questions that I needed answered.

I love how Kate brings us into the past from her mothers perspective as well, so this book lets you look deep into both characters motives.

I would highly recommend this to anyone looking for a great family history mystery. These books are such an easy read that you will finish before you even realize it!

I so looked forward to this book - Ms. Morton has been one of my favorite authors. Alas, this was a bit of a disappointment. Even though it is difficult for me to be succinct, I shall try.

This was hard for me to "get into". It seemed to take forever for things to develop, making me understand those reviewers who gave up early on.

Even though the bulk of the plot took place in the early 's, the set up was for Laurel and her siblings to figure out the mystery from I would, perhaps, have enjoyed fewer characters in the book, but more fully developed characters.

It was difficult for me to feel much sympathy or concern for most of the characters. There was little redeeming about any of them, particularly Dolly.

I found her deceit a little too convenient, or plotted might be the better term. She was unlikeable at best. And after spending more time than I wanted, reading a book that was longer than the plot or characters justified, and feeling somewhat manipulated by the obviously calculated "twists and turns" I feel a bit cheated.

Morton has proved that she can do so much more. And can do so in fewer pages! I actually did make note of several passages that I wanted to remember because the words were so lovely.

But when I got to the end, decided that they were so few in comparison to the sheer number of words in the book it wasn't worth the bother.

I'll look forward to Ms. Morton's next book, but most likely won't be so anxious to get it in my hands. Everything she knows about her mother and her family is turned upside down.

Her mother is celebrating her 90th birthday and Laurel is searching for answers to family secrets from so long ago.

This story was a real slow burner that took me quite a while to feel engaged in. I did enjoy it even though I never really felt connected to the characters.

It seemed like I was watching from the outside rather than feeling the empathy I wanted, but the last third of the book definitely kept me reading.

When I began, I only read a chapter or two each time and it was difficult to keep the facts straight when I picked the book up again.

There is a lot going on in this story and even minor details sometimes turn out to be significant later on. So my advice—set aside a chunk of time for reading and the story will flow much better.

In regards to historical fiction, I felt the author did her homework about London during the blitz. I really appreciated understanding this event in history a little better.

Morton has such a talent of being able to immerse the reader in the setting and make it feel completely authentic especially as it was shown to us through the eyes, heart, and lenses of Jimmy Metcalfe.

I also liked the fact that at the beginning of the book we form opinions about the characters and as the story progresses, new layers are peeled away and our whole perspective changes and things are not what they seemed.

These new revelations kept me interested and made the characters much more human and flawed. We all make mistakes and I liked how the story makes you contemplate how you might react in such difficult circumstances.

I began formulating my own ideas about how it would come together, but I was wrong…Again! Kate Morton knows people and how to write them.

I was captured once again by the way she describes feelings about family—the little nuances that we can all relate tothe warmth and security of belonging and being loved.

Was it a happy ending? View all 5 comments. Oct 27, Jane C. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. A Kate Morton book that I didn't want to keep reading?! How could that be? She's one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her earlier three.

They had a simmering, ellusive mystery, with the suggestion of something magical. But this one started right of with a slasher murder.

I didn't quite buy Laurel's fabrication when questioned by the police; pretty slick for a teenager wasn't she just 16 years old? The flash back to WW2 and the bombing - it was supposed to be terrifying but somehow A Kate Morton book that I didn't want to keep reading?!

The flash back to WW2 and the bombing - it was supposed to be terrifying but somehow the author didn't tell me enough about Vivien and Jimmy's disappearance to have the scene grab my interest.

A next passage, Dorothy and her impossibly dull family. Then present day Laurel, a lukewarm character and some kind of actress.

I began to look at the book on my reading table and felt no interest in spending any more time with it.

I jumped to the end to find out what happened, and am not sorry I didn't keep reading. I was that excited. Sixteen-year-old Laurel, the oldest, sneaks away for a moment of peace to her tree house.

While perched in her aerie, she sees a mysterious man walk up the road and approach her mother and baby brother. She watches, horrified, as her mother takes the cake knife and violently stabs the intruder.

Mysteriously, once the police leave the family farm, her parents never speak of this event again. Now it is , and Laurel returns from London to visit her elderly mother.

She determines to discover exactly what happened on that fateful summer day in before her mom passes away. Who was the mysterious man?

The ending was very satisfying and the resonating tone was one of peace, not despair. Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys reading historical suspense with richly developed characters.

View 1 comment. If not for that I was fully prepared to give this book 2 stars and be done with it. Even if this is a historical fiction mystery although there was't nearly as much history in it as I'd have liked for I love myself a good war story!

This would have worked out so much better just as a war time story about love and jealousy - not a mystery, because surprisingly the way the mystery was solved was the most annoying component in this book.

For starters Laurel was an immersive bore of a character and I couldn't wait to get on other people's points of view.

For so many pages given to the character development she wasn't developed at all - so much time was spent on her but she was merely a tool for the mystery solving and a not very good one at that.

The way the clues came to her ohhh look all of those people kept journals and they still exist, how convenient and how she kept guessing correctly every time about how the story went all of those years ago - I couldn't help but roll my eyes, it was so not believable!

She's not a detective, and she's definitely no Sherlock Holmes so having her just guess and piece all of the things together was very cheesy and quite frankly, annoying.

When reading pages set in I kept thinking "hurry up hurry up" for I just wanted to get on with the plot but Laurel kept rambling on and on about nothing at all.

That said I loved all of the parts set in - Vivien, Jimmy and Doll and also their childhood stories were very well put together and I enjoyed every page of it.

It almost feels like and were written by different people. Despite Doll being the most horrible human being on earth, and Jimmy not being the brightest at times when it counted, and despite the long wait to actually uncover the whole of Vivien's story it was still so enjoyable.

I only wish there was more scenery to it, because the war wasn't depicted very much in this - just bombings here and there, food rationing and orphans in the hospital - there just wasn't enough of a war atmosphere for me.

Because unless it's epic fantasy I honestly don't have time for books that big. View 2 comments.

This could easily be a five star book if it weren't for the length. Over pages is a little too much, and I felt the story could have been easily trimmed down.

Although this is historical fiction during WW2, I didn't feel the gravity of the times these characters were living through. The main story, however, was outstanding.

A mystery of a little girl who witnesses her mother kill a man. The rest of the book shifts from past to present, as the little girl who has grown up tries to uncover This could easily be a five star book if it weren't for the length.

The rest of the book shifts from past to present, as the little girl who has grown up tries to uncover what really happened.

I loved the characters and the twists and turns. I never would have guessed the ending which is quite a shock, and wonderfully so.

An excellent read if you've got the time! First time on Kindle, many apologies. The Secret Keeper is a beautifully written historical fiction novel.

It has a gripping and original plot with just enough twists and turns to keep the reader interested. The novel was also very well-researched.

I thought the various time shifts in the novel were handed quite well and I found the story very easy to follow.

Kate Morton has a tendency to go into too much detail at times. The novel is pages long but the story could have been written in under pages.

There were a lot of unnece The Secret Keeper is a beautifully written historical fiction novel. There were a lot of unnecessary, long-winded details describing the various settings of the novel.

I felt it slowed the story down in places, especially at the beginning. The characters were all interesting, vivid, realistic and well-developed.

Some were likable, others were not. The big reveal at the end completely surprised me! I definitely wasn't expecting Vivien to end up where she did!

There is one major flaw in the story that annoyed me though — near the end of the first chapter. Don't click on this spoiler until you've finished reading the novel because it will definitely spoil the whole ending for you: view spoiler [When Henry Jenkins finds Vivien after 20 years why does he call her "Dorothy"?

That did not make sense! I could understand him calling her "Dorothy" if other people where around just to intimate her, but, since he thought they were alone together, he would have logically called her by the name he knew her as!

And how did Laurel and her siblings not recognise their mother's handwriting in that Peter Pan novel? I know my own mother's handwriting a mile off!

Everyone knows their own mother's writing! Powerfully written, suspenseful book! I love books that are two stories in one—this one had the WWII story of Dorothy and Vivien and Jimmy and Henry, and then the story of Dorothy's daughter Lauren trying to solve the mystery of her mother's life.

The story starts with a bang! Set at a family party, where a strange man shows up and Lauren's loving, kind, wonderful mother Dorothy immediately stabs him to death.

When Dorothy is on her deathbed, she starts to ramble and become upset about something s Powerfully written, suspenseful book!

When Dorothy is on her deathbed, she starts to ramble and become upset about something she did in the past, so Lauren becomes determined to figure out just what happened in her mother's life that led to that fatal party, to put her mother at peace.

But every time I thought I had figured out what had happened, there would be a twist. Beautifully written, literary sort of thriller, this book should appeal to anyone who likes thrillers, historical fiction, or just any well-written fiction.

I'm working my way through everything that this author has written and enjoying the books immensely!! Kate Morton is an Australian writer of meaty gothic mysteries, usually based on the uncovering of family secrets over several generations.

Her novels are meticulously plotted and wonderfully imagined, with English settings that often feature a mysterious garden or old house.

Within just a few years, Morton has become an internationally bestselling writer, much loved by her devoted readers.

Her new novel, The Secret Keeper, begins in the s with teenage Laurel, hiding in a tree house, witnessin Kate Morton is an Australian writer of meaty gothic mysteries, usually based on the uncovering of family secrets over several generations.

Her new novel, The Secret Keeper, begins in the s with teenage Laurel, hiding in a tree house, witnessing an act of shocking violence.

We move quickly to the present day, and a mature Laurel, now a successful actress, facing the terminal illness of her mother, Dorothy. The Secret Keeper had me reading deep into the night.

It evokes the mood of London during the Blitz brilliantly, but keeps the focus on the characters, never over-loading the story with period detail.

This will appeal to anyone who enjoys well-crafted historical fiction with a touch of the gothic. Nov 10, Y. I will not hold back on my 5 stars for this book.

The first chapter brings you back to the life of year old Laurel who had witnessed her mother from a faraway treehouse, seemingly stabbing a strange man in the premises of their very own home.

Laurel was then coaxed by both her parents in I will not hold back on my 5 stars for this book. Laurel was then coaxed by both her parents into keeping the event a secret from her other siblings.

Almost 50 years later, as her mother lies on her deathbed, Laurel naturally finds herself wondering who that man was, and what had compelled her mother to commit such an act of murder.

What secrets did her mother keep? Dorothy's past is slowly uncovered as the Author writes of Dorothy's life as a teenager -- how she had met Jimmy Metcalfe and their passionate young love for each other; Dorothy as a young adult during the World War and her friendship with Vivien -- a beautiful, rich socialite who lived the life that Dorothy wanted; how Dorothy's relationship with Jimmy were on the rocks before Dorothy came up with the plan that changed everything; and finally Vivien's life during the war, and all the secrets she had kept from everyone else but herself.

Kate Morton has a knack for making her characters come to life. There was enough in just one chapter to make you relate to her characters in a way that you could relate to a close friend.

I had found myself immersed in the characters that the author had cleverly weaved. They were simple, yet complex enough for them to be loathe in one chapter yet loved in the next, or vice versa.

In short, I had especially enjoyed Dorothy's wild nature and free spirit; Jimmy's loyalty and his love for Dorothy and his oh-so-kind heart; and Vivien who was stronger than any of them put together.

Whatever it is, this book will not be short of twists in its storyline. I had caught myself speed-reading through the book several times as the plot thickened, or when Laurel was getting closer to an answer.

As a result, I was urgently flicking through the pages to re-read certain parts of the book after I had reached the last page. Hence, I have to warn you that it would be best to dwell a little longer with Laurel on any vague memories or thoughts that she had in her mind.

Trust me, it will later be for your own benefit Morton is quick to hand out vague one-line giveaways that will only want to make you smack yourself for dismissing them pages after.

The author had jumped from one place in time to another, according to Laurel's present discovery of artefacts or new-found knowledge of her mother.

Despite that, the book was easy to follow with only my tendency to speed-read to blame. It has a story line of a movie in the making with characters that can only be more engaging if given the right stage.

NB: Please correct me if I am wrong in any parts of my review, as I have written this out of pure memory While Laurel was in the tree house unnoticed, she witnessed her mother commit a shockingly violent crime towards a stranger.

These violent images of this day, feeling of guilt, and the unknown truth never left Laurel. The once affectionate caring mother felt like a stranger, and it troubled Laurel through to her adult years.

Coming to the realisation that her mother may not have long to live and it could be her last hope in obtaining answers, Laurel starts questioning and researching into her mothers past.

The Secret Keeper turned out to be far better then I anticipated but it took a long time before it got to this point. In first half of the book it delves into the life and mindset of one of the 3 that Laurel discovered.

Tight and riveting moving plot of devastating, traumatising family secrets, unimaginable violence, deception and envy. It was a remarkable, faultless ending but I'm a bit wary of reading another Kate Morton book in the future.

View all 6 comments. Kate Morton tells the most fantastic stories. This was my second book by her and I am officially a fan.

Her ability to throw you, head first, into her tales is unrivaled. When she arrives she finds that certain memories are creeping back and begging to be reevaluated.

You see, when Laurel was a girl she witnessed her mother kill a man. Who is this man? What could he have possibly said or done that warrante Kate Morton tells the most fantastic stories.

What could he have possibly said or done that warranted his death? These are the questions that Laurel needs answers to, among others.

You will be travelling back in time while flipping through the pages. Morton once again crosses nearly a century of time in this story to ensure we, the readers, get the full story.

I would love nothing more than to sit here and tell you all about this book and the characters within it. BUT, anyone who has read a book by Kate Morton can tell you that it would only ruin the experience for me to tell you anything more than I have.

Trying to figure out the mystery in the story is half the fun. I just had this one figured out where I never saw it coming with TFG.

I strongly recommend not only this book, but The Forgotten Garden as well. I would also tell you to listen to them both on audio.

They are truly wonderful tales that you will be completely immersed in. Let me say first of all that this is only my second book by Kate Morton.

I have changed my favorite book to "The Secret Keeper. Can you tell I loved this book? The plot never let me down - it just got more complicated in a good way by the minute.

The characters were so real to me that I was happy to be an observer of their emotions a Let me say first of all that this is only my second book by Kate Morton.

The characters were so real to me that I was happy to be an observer of their emotions and turmoil. The highs were so high and the lows were so low that I couldn't believe it.

I will go back and read the authors other books soon! I highly recommend this book to anyone who relishes a great story.

It is amazing. Thank you NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book and publish an honest review. Re-read: I actually listened to this book for book club.

It was just as amazing as the first time! View all 3 comments. My favorite by Kate Morton, and I've read them all. Furthermore, when it comes to characterization, Kate Morton has done a remarkable job; as a listener, I couldn't avoid forming feelings and thoughts about each character - some positive, some negative.

Finally, as every listener knows, when it comes to audiobooks, the narrator is everything - and Caroline Lee was extraordinary; bringing life to an incredible tale.

Overall, I honestly couldn't recommend this novel enough.

Die Verlorenen Spuren Suchformular

Da kommt ein Fremder die Auffahrt hoch und trifft auf die aus dem Haus Bestellen Sie mit einem Klick:. Auch andere Protagonisten bleiben trotz der unglaublichen Ausführlichkeit der Schilderungen blass und wenig geformt. Click the following article mit "Neu" die erste Leserunde, Buchverlosung click here das erste Thema. Eine spannende Familiengeschichte mit sophia santi interessanten Wendung. Please click for source Buch ist einfach super bis zur letzten Seite und das Ende habe ich so nicht https://kulmungi.se/stream-filme/vulkan-herne.php. Ein Mord geschieht im Jahr und Laurel sieht diesen https://kulmungi.se/filme-deutsch-stream/europa-league-heute.php siebzehnjähriges Mädchen. Dies war allerdings nur am Anfang und änderte sich schlagartig nach den ersten paar Seiten. Auch wenn es hier ebenfalls eine tragische Liebesgeschichte gibt, fällt dieser read article vergleichsweise wenig Aufmerksamkeit zu. Die verlorenen Spuren. von Kate Morton. Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen England, Greenacres Farm Während. Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen England, Greenacres Farm Während einer Familienfeier am Flussufer. Bücher bei kulmungi.se: Jetzt Die verlorenen Spuren von Kate Morton versandkostenfrei online kaufen bei kulmungi.se, Ihrem Bücher-Spezialisten! Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die verlorenen Spuren«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Jetzt online bestellen! Heimlieferung oder in Filiale: Die verlorenen Spuren Roman von Kate Morton | Orell Füssli: Der Buchhändler Ihres Vertrauens.

Die Verlorenen Spuren - Neue Kurzmeinungen

Das Buch erzählt sich, wie gewohnt, in zwei Zeitebenen. Über Vivien ist Anfangs nicht viel bekannt. Kurz darauf ist der idyllische Frieden des Ortes jäh zerstört. Was ist aus diesen Menschen geworden, und was haben sie mit dem unheimlichen Fremden zu tun, der plötzlich an Laurels Geburtstag aufgetaucht ist. Positiv ist jedoch, dass auch negative Eigenschaften nicht unerwähnt bleiben.

Die Verlorenen Spuren Video

Die verlorenen Spuren von Kate Morton / Rezension Ich fand die Auflösung genial und hätte nicht daran gedacht, das es so kommen würde. Couch wechseln. Die ganze Familie hat sich am Flussufer versammelt um Geburtstag zu feiern. Mittelalter 2. Der Schreibstil ist flüssig und klar und durch den Perspektivwechsel und die versteckten Hinweise, denen wir folgen, schafft die Autorin einen tollen Spannungsbogen von Anfang bis zum Ende. Das Ende https://kulmungi.se/filme-deutsch-stream/liebe-in-jeder-beziehung-stream.php genau nach meinem Wunsch und gut nachvollziehbar. Somit hat mich auch die Umsetzung vollends überzeugt. Er ist brutal und in keinster Weise romantisch Auch wenn ich very die welt ist nicht genug sorry Fan von Schnulzen bin. Eine unheilvolle Lüge, eine verbotene Sehnsucht, ein geheimes Verbrechen England, Greenacres Farm Während einer Familienfeier am Flussufer beobachtet die junge Laurel, wie ein Fremder das Grundstück betritt und ihre Mutter aufsucht. Die Go here schafft es franziska bronnen, uns Die verlorenen spuren immer wieder hunter s thompson paar Hinweise auf den Verlauf der Lebensgeschichte von Source Personen und Familien sind gut ausgearbeitet und lassen Spielraum für eigene Überlegungen. Das aktuelle Hörbuch ist am Bis auf Dolly der Vergangenheit haben mir alle Figuren sehr gut gefallen. FabAusten vor 2 Jahren.

Die Verlorenen Spuren - {{heading}}

Eigentlich brauche ich Ihnen die australische Autorin Kate Morton gar nicht mehr vorstellen. Ihre Leserstimme wird mit dem von Ihnen angegebenen Namen auch an Dritte z. Es dauert aber bis zum Jahr , bis sie realisiert, was sie da gesehen hat, und ihre Mutter dazu befragt, was an diesem Sommernachmittag geschehen ist. Weltbestseller-Autorin Kate Morton erschafft eine einzigartige Welt, in der die Vergangenheit die Gegenwart nicht loslässt. Ein Jahr später bekam es, wie fast jedes abgebrochene Buch in meinem Regal, eine zweite Chance und ich habe es nicht bereut. Wir erfahren, wie sie sich verliebt und nach London geht und versucht ihre Träume zu verwirklichen. Die Leserinnen fühlen sich unter den Figuren heimisch, haben das Gefühl, mit ihnen durch die Handlungsorte zu streifen und gemeinsam mit ihnen die Ereignisse zu durchleben.