Die geächteten

Die Geächteten 111 Seiten, Note: 1,5

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Obwohl kaum jemand darГјber spricht aus Angst, dass man sich lustig macht oder sozial geГ¤chtet wird, machen es insgeheim sehr, sehr viel mehr Menschen​. a u k l ia reг□,╫ a4 %¤ e h eu tS¤ geг□ B e t rS¤ eгЇ ssyst e m eк %¤ e sHЇ e z i​ugl ¤ ch s e h r u2□ t er schs¤ eй l ¤ ch e V or a u ss e tz u2□ chtet w er eг□. Das Vieh wird zunehmend in Gro_die geГ¤chteten. This isn't the case in When She Woke. There are more, but you get the idea. Tamta ekhvaia rated it liked it Apr 27, But I was willing just click for source overlook. I also really liked the link between Kayla and Hannah, who meet at the rehabilitation center once Hannah is discharged from prison. Click are other times when this is. I can't really pinpoint it, learn more here something felt like it liz torres missing to me. But it breathes fresh air on an old topic, and this futuristic, dystopian society is the perfect vehicle for Hannah's journey through self-discovery. Secondary characters are plausibly well-rounded and the narrative is clear; I found go here wanting to read just a little bit more and then just a click at this page bit more after .

And yet the only thing that scares me as much as a world where religion is outlawed is a world in which religion is THE law.

I will say, however, that this book made me incredibly sad. Please be aware that this was not Christian fiction, but is instead a book that portrays Christianity as one of its villains.

Christians can be some of the most unforgiving and judgmental people on the planet, which has to infuriate Jesus.

He spent His time with fishermen and tax collectors and prostitutes and beggars, with the poor and the broken and those rejected by society.

He was despised by those who should have recognized Him, and He died for it. And if He had chosen to come a couple thousand years later, I think He would have met the same fate; it just would have been televised.

As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.

Not by the words we spout or the bumper stickers on our cars or the way we look down our noses at others. And I hope and I pray every single day that people see the love of Jesus in me when I interact with them, not judgement or hatred.

God is love. And if we remember this, if we do our best each day to live this, then the future forecast in this book will never become a reality.

For more of my reviews, as well as my own fiction and thoughts on life, check out my blog, Celestial Musings. View all 48 comments.

Oh dear. It was dreadful. I'm not a big fan of "How to write" checklists; they're usually far too prescriptive, and very negative a list of don'ts.

However, I found myself wanting to shriek "Show, don't tell" every few pages. I kept reading only because I had time on my hands and thought it could only get better it didn't.

The story opens as she wakes after having an illegal abortion all abortions are illegal , having been recoloured as part of her punishment.

The only original idea, which has potential, is melachroming as a punishment. They usually end up homeless, jobless and ultimately lifeless.

Making colour the focus of the story also has potential for interesting parallels with racism, but there aren't really any, other than a passing observation that racism still exists, but that Chromes suffer far greater stigma than ethnic minorities.

It was painfully banal, spelling out everything in crassly obvious ways, rather that letting the reader interpret what isn't a particularly difficult story.

Maybe it would work better as a film? For example, a cold, unpleasant woman called Bridget is nicknamed Fridget.

But just in case you can't work out why, Jordan has to spell it out, "The woman's an iceberg". I could pick out more examples, but it's the relentless and cumulative effect of so many of them that I found so infuriating.

But here are a couple more, mainly for my future reference: view spoiler ["Had being a Red given her an extra sense, a knowledge of the hidden desires and evil in others?

Hannah misses her sister, but talk about over-explaining: "Hannah felt Becca's absence keenly. As different as they were they'd always been close.

Now, Hannah had no one with whom she could share her inner life. And it's not just pregnancy metaphors; there are Christian themes, so when view spoiler [on the run and hide spoiler ] having her hear washed, "Warm water streamed from the crown of Hannah's head down her scalp.

What a strange baptism , she thought. It's clear enough that they're a recurring theme literal and metaphorical , but lest you miss it, there's a handy list of them on page and a couple of other explicit references to not wanting to be boxed in again.

Language is important in the abortion debate. For instance, the appropriation of the term "pro-life" creates a problem for those who dislike abortion, but think it should be an option.

Using emotive terms like "murder", rather than clinical ones like "procedure" have weight and bias, too. These issues are touched on a couple of times, but it's like sociology or linguistics By tackling the horrors that can arise from strict prohibition of abortion, I expected this to be a liberal-minded book, and although I can see why Jordan wouldn't want to alienate more ambivalent readers by coming across as pro-abortion not that I think anyone is actually PRO-abortion , this sits very oddly with the discomfort I felt at the way homosexuality and possibly transvestism were tackled.

Homosexuality Hannah's church thinks homosexuality is a sin though not all the churches in her world do , and it's a while before Hannah questions that.

I see sexual attraction as a spectrum, rather than two or three fixed categories, but it just didn't ring true for me. Related to that, sex seems to be a magical cure for past abuses, view spoiler [but straight sex is more curative than gay sex hide spoiler ].

Transvestism Analogy? Hannah's impetus for making her secret clothes is described in ways I've often heard transvestites describe their cross-dressing.

This felt rather strange and maybe inappropriate: "Though she'd known she could never wear them openly, the mere fact of their existence, their prodigal beauty, had buoyed her".

I have to make them, or I'll explode", and he understands, "They're an essential part of you. A part you can't express any other way.

Inevitably, all the blame and punishment for abortions falls on the women and abortionists; the fathers may be named and fined, but I don't think they become Chromes.

At one point, Hannah finds a few lines of a poem about Menelaus and Helen of Troy carved under some furniture, but unlike almost everything else in the story, this isn't explained.

It's never referred to again, either. Like The Handmaid's Tale, this is set in the near future, in north America, when fertility has been damaged, so strict religion is used to limit women's sexual freedom and fertility.

However, in this society, not everyone in religious; for instance, Hannah's colleague is open about her promiscuity.

As long as she never tries to get an abortion, it's apparently OK. In Handmaid, no specific religion is named; in this, it refers explicitly to Christians, except once, when Mormons are mentioned I know they describe themselves as Christians, but many other denominations don't agree and the fact that Utah "was the nexus of the conservative backlash".

I don't know if it's intended as a specific attack on Mormons or not. As in Handmaid, colours and clothes are highly significant, and instead of tulips, there are a couple of orchids.

Jane Austen gets an explicit mention as the name of one of her characters is used as a code name.

The resistance use code names that are all the names of famous 20th century feminists. There's a sinister character whose name is nearly the same as a dodgy Dickens character Billy Sykes , but as he's just a fleeting appearance, I wonder if it's just a gimmick, as with Austen.

Another editing failure is the French Canadian who speaks perfect English at first, but later, it's distinctly unidiomatic and stilted.

And if you're ever on the run and want to plan a route, try this: "Show quickest route Oh well, at least it made me laugh.

View all 18 comments. How absolutely cool is the premise of this book? In this dystopian society, skin is genetically mutated a certain color to paint convicts to represent their crimes.

Red skin means murderer. In this society, red skin also means someone who has had an abortion, a procedure that has been deemed illegal now that Roe V.

Wade has been overturned. This novel had the potential to be as frightening as Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale , a novel that didn't seem entirely far fetched when it was published, and s How absolutely cool is the premise of this book?

This novel had the potential to be as frightening as Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale , a novel that didn't seem entirely far fetched when it was published, and still does not in a world where women still have to fight for their right to have complete control over their bodies.

I think books of this nature are especially important given the current fight over birth control that has cropped up as candidates fight to challenge Obama in this year's election.

People like Rush Limbaugh really exist. There are groups of people out there who want a world like this one to be the one we live in.

Books like this one are almost realistic fiction when you think about it like that. The novel starts out strong.

Hannah Payne has recently been transformed to become a Chrome, her skin mutated Red, to represent her crime of abortion.

She must live her days on camera inside of jail, where her every move is being broadcasted to people at home for their entertainment.

Experiencing with Hannah her first moments as a Chrome, alone in solitary, is deeply intimate. Because of her perceived crime Hannah is subjected to humiliation and psychological torture.

It was very interesting and painful to be inside of Hannah's head as she dealt with this experience. Hannah is soon released and dropped off in a religious facility aimed at "curing" women chromes and bringing them back to the light of Jesus or whatever.

This section of the book actually wasn't half bad. There were definitely some great points made using Hannah's experiences in that facility; perhaps Jordan should not have been so heavy handed with the message and allowed the "evil" characters to be humanized a bit.

A particularly frightening thing about this facility was that Hannah and others were forced to create and carry around dolls that represented the "child" they aborted.

Once Hannah leaves the facility things get a little far fetched. She joins a sort of underground program put in place by those that oppose the new government and after that it is one unbelievable situation after another.

Hannah's narrative is also a little weird. She still considers herself a murderer, even if she doesn't believe she deserves all of the ways she's been treated, and that is never resolved.

I also didn't buy her loyalty to the father of the fetus, or why she would put entire groups of people at risk just to see him one last time.

Also, there is a brief segue into lesbianism that would have had more meaning if it had, well, meant anything at all and didn't seem to be just a convenient plot point to represent Hannah's supposed awakening.

I think this book would have been far better served if it had focused on Hannah being made an outcast by society as a whole, and the treatment she would have received trying to live a normal life as a Red, in a world where abortion is legally viewed as murder.

I'm mixed on whether or not I'd recommend this one. It was a fairly enjoyable read, the idea of chromes was fantastic, the feminist themes were important, but in the end it fell short of everything it was trying to accomplish.

I'd much rather recommend The Handmaid's Tale instead. View all 6 comments. It has its faults, but you know, it tries.

It's no "The Handmaid's Tale", but it tries. And gorrammit, that ruined the message of the book for me. And sure, it's better than the sh!

But this is no story about a woman's journey. It's a story about a woman whining after a man. And I think because Jordan is a half-decent writer with a half-decent world is what makes this story even more infuriating.

But noooooooo Not recommended. Full Review: Hannah Payne has now been chromed - a process to punish people while alleviating the pressure on the jail system - for the abortion of a child she conceived while sleeping with her minister.

She must struggle through a world that tells her at every opportunity that what she did was wrong while also learning more and more about herself.

I should love this book. In many ways, Hannah's journey is not all that different from mine.

I lived similarly secluded in my evangelical right-wing movement, thinking that homosexuals were going to hell, that abortion was murder, and that anyone who didn't go to my denomination of church was ending up in hell.

You will be glad to know that I no longer believe all those things. The book is also more fact than fiction, particularly if you are familiar with the Wendy Davis filibuster that occurred in Texas just this past summer.

Reading about the shunning of women, how few options they have, how they are vilified for trying to make a good life - that's enough to make you rage at the system.

And for that, the book is great. That said, I ended up not liking the book very, very much - mostly in part to one final key scene that seemed to ruin the entire message of the book.

But there were plenty of other key points that drove the rating down, not just the ending. I could easily see us reaching the point where abortions were outlawed and the religious right rose up and abolished the separation of church vs state.

I could see her slowly open up, to take the people she meets and realize, yes, they aren't so bad, that maybe her previous way of thinking wasn't the only way.

I really, really can't get over how selfish and using she is, nor how blindly passive she is all the while claiming how she "chose" to do this or that.

Nearly every person she comes in contact with, she finds some way to soak something out of - her father, Kayla, Simone, even Aiden and I do NOT like Aiden.

And then, Hannah claims to be so active, to make all these choices, but when you boil it down, she mostly just bounces between crazy events.

The women are incredibly evil or weak, from Hannah's shrewish, domineering hateful mother to Mrs. Henley a hateful, beastly woman to the cold, infertile Alyssa to the weak, desperate Becca.

Not to mention, Hannah makes sure to cast judgment on every one, from how pretty they aren't or how desparate they are.

And then you have Aiden, our "Love Interest", who is second only to Hannah in selfishness. For a man who supposedly loves this woman, why did he never speak out sooner?

Sacrifice his career, his fame, his reputation to speak on her behalf? Oh, no, couldn't do that!

We must protect the man, the privileged man in this patriarchal society! Really, this was merely tossed in there to be edgy.

I can't say it enough - Hannah never once came across as wanting to be a lesbian or even bisexual, until suddenly, boom, it happened.

It's VERY insulting, and not to mention, once again Hannah uses someone for her own selfish purposes. And then tosses that person aside for Aiden.

This is not to say this scene couldn't have worked. It could have - if Hannah hadn't bothered to go back to Aiden. Or if when she did, she realized how she really didn't love him anymore.

But as it is written, it makes me despise Hannah even more. I despise the man. Time and again, we are led to believe he loves Hannah - but what has the man ever done to prove it?

He said outright in the beginning he'd never leave his wife for Hannah - strike one. When Hannah was arrested, he never spoke out on her behalf - strike two.

Hannah has to drive across country to meet up with him - strike three, and you're out! Given the book we're reading, it comes out of nowhere and, for me, completely ruins the message of the book.

In fact, that ending makes as much sense to me as having the the power of lurve remove the chroming with Aiden and Hannah miraculously changing the government and farting out three babies.

If this book were really about Hannah's development as a woman, she would grow up and realize how selfish a prick Aiden was. How little he sacrificed and how much power he would have to help her.

Instead, she protects him, the fly protecting the swatter, the subjugated holding up the ones in power. You know, what's been going on for the last hundred years.

What does Aiden have to lose? He's a male in a patriarchal society. Everyone will side with him - "Poor preacher, being seduced by that vile woman!

Teenaged girls being blamed for their sexual abuse. Adulterers getting off the hook because those vile women in short, tight skirts.

Aiden commits adultery, has little regard for his wife, doesn't bother to help Hannah - but somehow, he's worth Hannah sacrificing her freedom to see him.

Even in the end, he doesn't abandon his job to seek her out; no, that would be much too much to sacrifice.

Instead, Hannah has to brave the streets, arrest, incarceration, further abuse, to seek HIM out.

And after she uses him has sex , she decides that she's outgrown him and needs to leave him. No, Hannah, you don't. You have become just as selfish and despicable as Aiden.

You know how this book should have ended? Hannah goes back to find that Aiden has hopped into bed with some other woman that isn't his wife.

Aiden isn't there waiting and begging for her; he just wants to find a playmate to keep him busy.

Then Hannah should grow some ovaries and help find Kayla, maybe even get back with Simone and have a real relationship instead of some half-assed "Lemme pretend to be a lesbian because ooooh, it's edgy and cool but don't worry I'm still straight!

It's a very, very weak diluted version of THT, with nowhere near the strength of character or the powerful message - or the decency to give us a good, gritty ending.

Personally, I don't recommend this for anyone. I'd rather see people read The Handmaid's Tale. If it hadn't been for that final scene, I would definitely have rated it higher and been a bit more generous with my recommendation.

Shelves: owned , big-issues. I really loved this book. Not only was the plot compelling and fast-paced, but the issues explored in the story abortion, religion, justice, feminism, individualism, etc were pretty thought-provoking.

The author also did a fantastic job creating complex, believable, intensely human characters. Hannah's personal development through the course of the novel in particular was well done.

Great read, highly recommended. Not flushed, not sunburned, but the solid, declarative red of a stop sign. Blending the religious fervour and moralising of The Scarlet Letter with the chilling dystopian repression and tight control of The Handmaid's Tale , Jordan has created a very human story, one about love and loyalty, b "When she woke, she was red.

Blending the religious fervour and moralising of The Scarlet Letter with the chilling dystopian repression and tight control of The Handmaid's Tale , Jordan has created a very human story, one about love and loyalty, belief and redemption, a coming-of-age story set in a rigorously constrained religious society that is only one small leap of the imagination away from present-day United States.

There are several kinds of Chromes, each a different colour designated to a certain kind of crime. Yellow is for minor misdemeanours.

Blue is for child molesters. Red is for murder, and so the state of Texas - and most others - have decreed abortion to be.

For refusing to name the father of her unborn child and the abortionist, Hannah received the maximum sentence. After being injected with compound that causes the skin mutation which must be renewed every four months to avoid "fragmentation" of the mind, a side-effect created to ensure renewal because the dye - or "melachroming" - fades , every part of Hannah's being is controlled by the state.

The first thirty days is spent in the Chrome ward, in a bare white room where there is no privacy and cameras record her every movement for the reality TV show that is the Chrome ward.

Female Chromes, being rarer, tend to be more popular viewing material. Ninety percent of Chromes go mad during their time in the ward; Hannah comes close, no matter that she was determined to get through it.

Once released, only her father will speak to her. Her mother has all but disowned her, or so Hannah believes, and her older sister Becca married a man with a small mind, strong judgements and violent tendencies who keeps Becca completely under his thumb.

With the help of Reverend Aidan Dale, her former pastor at the Plano Church of the Ignited Word, now the secretary of faith for the president and something of a celebrity, a bed for Hannah has been found at a halfway house for Chrome women called the Straight Path Center, run by the reverend of another strict religious group - though it's soon clear that it's his wife, Mrs Henley, who manages everything.

With rules dictating every moment of their day and everything they can and can't do, the centre focuses on rehabilitating the women, but as the days go by Hannah is quick to realise that this place is determined to crush her spirit utterly, and in the cruelest way possible.

With her lover possibly moving on with his life, her family refusing to take her in, and nowhere to go, it seems like Hannah has no choice but to obey Mrs Henley and endure her manipulations.

The world beyond the walls of the centre are a vulnerable place for a female Chrome, and Hannah has led an incredibly sheltered life, schooled in her faith and little else.

Her one skill is sewing, and in secret she made elaborate dresses for herself, a creative outlet. And she believes in her sin, her guilt, her transgression against God, even while she questions everything else.

But to survive in this new world that she's been thrust into as a Chrome, Hannah must question everything she ever believed, and come to some new understanding about her faith, and herself.

This book had me riveted, and immediately became a new favourite of mine. All the disparate parts of the plot, the writing style and the context, came together so seamlessly.

It is a novel of extremes and Puritanical drama nested in a high-stakes adventure story, but it also had its subtle, quiet moments.

It's that balance that Jordan achieved that really won me over: a story about a woman losing her faith and then discovering a more liberated version would normally have had my toes curling in wariness and even disdain, but Hannah was so likeable, so utterly human in all her flaws and good points, her story so raw and honest, that instead I was caught up in her crisis.

Hannah changes subtly over the course of the novel. You see the woman she had the potential to be in the snippets of the past as she recollects incidents, scenes with her family, so that the repressed Hannah, and the potential of Hannah, and the new Hannah, merge together without you hardly realising.

With virtually no survival skills, little education and an upbringing rich in dogma and moral code, I wasn't sure what would happen to Hannah, whether she'd survive or whether even worse things would happen to her, once "outside".

It made for a tense read, at times. Once again, she marveled at her certainty. Had becoming a Red given her an extra sense, a knowledge of the hidden desires and evil in other hearts?

She shook her head as a more likely, less romantic explanation occurred to her: becoming a Red had forced her, for the first time in her life, to really pay attention.

She was a curious sort, whose curiosity was always repulsed, smothered. She was creative, and needed an outlet.

While I kept feeling suspicious of Aidan Dale, her lover, for pretty much the entire book - is it because he was a preacher, that I felt instinctively suspicious, or because he was so popular, and such a charmer?

I just wished that she hadn't led such an awfully sheltered life, that she had no room to explore and discover things naturally, and so understand her feelings, her body, her options.

And certainly, now that I've had a child of my own, it was much more horrible reading of her lonely decision to abort than it would have been had I read this a few years ago.

I still can't judge her for that. As Hannah loses her faith, her naivety, the world around her becomes harsher, crueler, full of jagged edges on which she catches herself continually.

It is not that the world changes, but that the bubble that kept her safe and in ignorance has gone. The contrast is striking - not over-the-top, not even all that obvious after all, Hannah's dystopian real world isn't that different from what we're familiar with , but watching Hannah learn to navigate her way through a crueler reality than what she'd ever known before, brings with it a mixture of pride in her, and sadness that it's happening to her at all.

Being thrust out into the real world, away from her sheltered family life, enables her to meet new people, people who think differently, independently.

They've come up with their own ideas, after thinking things through - something Hannah was never allowed to do. I mean, not like they taught us in church, anyway.

I figure if there is a God, She's good and surged right now about the state of things down here. Why, when she no longer believed, would she respond like that?

It had been pure reflex, she realized. She had no more control over it than she would over her salivary glands in the presence of freshly baked bread.

Was that all her religious beliefs had ever been then, a set of precepts so deeply inculcated in her that they became automatic, even instinctive?

Hear the word God , think He. See the misery of humankind, blame Eve. Obey your parents, be a good girl, vote Trinity Party, never sit with your legs apart.

Don't question, just do as you're told. While Hannah learns to have renewed faith in God, on her own terms, and never stops thinking of her abortion as a deed that murdered an unborn baby, even after hearing other perspectives on it, this is a story about questioning things, questioning other people's so-called moral right to make decisions about your body, your life.

A story about questioning what people do in the name of God, and God itself - as a concept, an entity, a philosophy. It's a story about growing up, making decisions and mistakes, that you can be a good person without being brow-beaten or guilt-tripped into it.

All Hannah knew about them was that they were both long-dead writers, but they were evidently favorites of Kayla's, because her face lit up, and she plunged into an animated discussion about them with Stanton.

Listening to their exchange, Hannah was suffused with bitterness about her own ignorance. If she hadn't had to sneak books into the house and read them in hasty, furtive snatches, if she'd gone to a normal high school and then on to college as Kayla had, she too would have been able to assert that Miss Welty could write circles around Faulkner and have an opinion as to whether Streetcar Named Desire or The Glass Menagerie was Williams's masterpiece.

She'd always believed that her parents had done right by her, but now, sitting mute at Stanton's table, she found herself seething over their choices.

Why had they kept her life so small? Why had they never asked her what she wanted? At every possible turn, she saw, they'd chosen the path that would keep her weak and dependent.

And the fact that they wouldn't see it that way, that they sincerely believed they'd acted in her best interest, didn't make it any less true, or them any less culpable.

But it breathes fresh air on an old topic, and this futuristic, dystopian society is the perfect vehicle for Hannah's journey through self-discovery.

She literally wakes up. She always had it in her - she was the daughter who asked pesky questions, not Becca, and who read books her parents wouldn't approve of and allowed herself a creative outlet through the dresses.

Becoming a Red was a gigantic, cruel wake-up call, but when you're deeply entrenched in a strict religion like this, and you do genuinely love and respect your parents, nothing short of a drastic change in circumstances will do it.

Because I'm not religious, not even close, and I'm pro-choice, I found the issues tackled in When She Woke invigorating. It doesn't shy away from hard questions or guilty consciences, and it always felt very real.

I could easily imagine this wasn't a futuristic setting at all, because I can easily see the United States adopting these laws, and melachroming, if they had the technology.

There is a lot going on here, some of it obvious, some of it not. I've barely even discussed the setting, but I find myself rambling and need to stopper it.

The dystopian world was fascinating and solidly constructed, serving as context and propulsion for Hannah's crisis of faith and journey of self-discovery.

To be honest, I doubt I would have enjoyed this so much if it hadn't had the science fiction and dystopian elements to it, though Jordan's writing is very enjoyable.

Highly recommended, especially for those of us yearning for a good dystopian, speculative fiction read who've been relying on YA for it and coming away deeply unsatisfied.

View all 7 comments. First off, I do not just go around tossing out 5 stars all willy nilly. This is something I reserve only for my very favorite books.

I predict that this book is going to be a hit with book clubs across the nation. It is an excellent read, it is provocative, enthralling, and thought provoking.

This subject matter sticks with you. It forces you to take a closer look at your beliefs and see things from a different point of view.

I highly recommend checking it out when it is released. Hillary Jordan First off, I do not just go around tossing out 5 stars all willy nilly.

Hillary Jordan is an expert at crafting a well told story. Hannah is a Red; her crime is murder. When She Woke is a fable about a stigmatized woman struggling to navigate an America of a not-too-distant future—where the line between church and state has been eradicated and convicted felons are no longer imprisoned and rehabilitated but chromed and released back into the population to survive as best they can.

In seeking a path to safety in an alien and hostile world, Hannah unknowingly embarks on a path of self-discovery that forces her to question the values she once held true and the righteousness of a country that politicizes faith.

View all 9 comments. Hannah Payne is twenty-six years old and Red, with a capital R, her badge of shame. Other criminals of the s Hannah Payne is twenty-six years old and Red, with a capital R, her badge of shame.

Hannah is deeply in love with the married Aiden, and refuses to upbraid him or the doctor who was kind and tender to her.

She is also a product of her religious upbringing, and when she wakes up Red, she believes that she deserves this punishment.

Her exuberance is like a lit match that never goes out. Much of the time, Hannah is on the lam with her newfound Red friend, Kayla, and heartily braves and overcomes dangerous hurdles at a page-turning glee.

In this near-future world, Roe v Wade has been overturned, and most of the fifty states have outlawed abortion. From reading this book, it appears that abortion is the primary preoccupation of the militant State, and that Aidan Dale is the only celebrity on the vid.

Much of the novel takes place in the North Dallas area, where Jordan partly grew up. She knows the ingrained and forceful pieties of the area the actual geographical area of Roe v Wade , and seems to draw on them.

She has a gift for thrumming action, even if it tends toward didacticism and a tidy outcome. It may seem lurid at face value, or even gratuitous, but it is anything but—rather, it is sublime in its implication.

This was the high point of refinement in this not typically nuanced novel. Twists and turns are relentless and exciting, although it is obvious, in this world of morally challenged monkeys running the State, who will finally prevail.

Ambiguity is not a paramount trait in this heavy-handed story with potboiler themes. It is comfort food—like popcorn with a little too much butter, and addictive.

View all 12 comments. Cautionary tale about separation of church and state. Wade has been appealed. Truly horrific scenes are presented to the reader in this futuristic, dystopic, American society.

I give props to Hillary Jordan for the concept of this novel. And yet. The last third of the book was not as strong as its beginning and was even a bit silly at times.

If this reader had her way, Hillary Jordan would have taken as much time developing the characters and ideas she put forth in the beginning and resisted the cliches found at the end: not all Christians are brutes!

View all 8 comments. The premise hooked me, a modern day Scarlet Letter meets Margaret Atwood, and the beginning few chapters had me intrigued as to what type of world this woman lived in.

I especially liked the idea of her receiving red skin for the 'murder' of her unborn child. I thought, "hmm, how will she fit into this dystopian society?

Quickly, it became apparent to me that this wa The premise hooked me, a modern day Scarlet Letter meets Margaret Atwood, and the beginning few chapters had me intrigued as to what type of world this woman lived in.

Quickly, it became apparent to me that this wasn't going to be the brilliant writing style of Hawthorne or Atwood, who created worlds in which the reader was asked to contemplate the novel and think about his or her own world view as it relates to the event that unfolded.

No, in fact, I never once had to ask myself, "I wonder what this symbolizes," or "what is she trying to say here? Changed," you know that your hand is being held by the author and you won't have to worry about thinking for yourself which is hilariously ironic , the path has been cleared for you.

In a nutshell, this author's message was blatant and, while her message is a simple one of acceptance and love, it was force fed and that insulted me as a reader.

View 1 comment. It takes a special book to hook me into reading it in one sitting. Maybe it's the timeliness to the current political and faith debate, maybe it's my affinity for The Scarlet Letter , or maybe Hillary Jordan is just that damn good.

Whatever the maybe, this book grabs you and drops you into a completely realized world that is both terrifying and familiar.

If you enjoy books like The Handmaid's Tale , or even the more current and YA focused The Hunger Games Trilogy , this book is sure to grab your in It takes a special book to hook me into reading it in one sitting.

In fact while the prose is sometimes thick yet beautiful, the protagonist, Hannah, is so sheltered that she almost reads as a YA character, despite her being 26 at the start of the novel.

Every now and again I love to read dystopian literature that is well written and interesting. When She Woke, tells the story of a stigmatized woman struggling to navigate an America of a not-too-distant future, where the line between church and state has been eradicated and convicted felons are no longer imprisoned and rehabilitated but chromed—their skin colour is genetically altered to match the clas When she Woke is the second novel I have read by Hillary Jordan and I really enjoyed this story.

When She Woke, tells the story of a stigmatized woman struggling to navigate an America of a not-too-distant future, where the line between church and state has been eradicated and convicted felons are no longer imprisoned and rehabilitated but chromed—their skin colour is genetically altered to match the class of their crimes—and then released back into the population to survive as best they can.

When She Woke is imaginative, suspenseful, and thought-provoking read. It is a story of one woman's struggle to survive against the odds, and a story of self-discovery.

I loved how real this book felt and how engrossed in the story I became. The book is exactly the right length at pages and Hillary Jordan wastes no time in creating an atmosphere.

This is not going to be everyone's cup of tea but I would recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys reading dystopian literature and I think it would make a good book club read as there is plenty of discussion and while it may take some readers out of their comfort zone it is certainly a thought provoking book.

I feel like I was tricked into reading a book that was really religious I don't really appreciate a modern book telling me that life is an empty void without God.

Whether or not she's echoing Nathanial Hawthorne I'm not sure it's been about a decade since I read the Scarlet Letter , but I was pretty sure this was all the author's opinions too.

Also view spoiler [Aidan should have died. Kill that fucker. Nathanial kill I feel like I was tricked into reading a book that was really religious Nathanial killed Dimmsdale.

The end. Where I got the book: purchased on Kindle. A book club read. This is a modern reworking of The Scarlet Letter , which is a book I started but didn't finish.

I think I need to get an audiobook version, as Hawthorne is one of those writers I find much more acceptable in narration Thackeray is another.

But I digress. Hannah, up t Where I got the book: purchased on Kindle. Hannah, up till that point a good Christian girl, terminates her pregnancy to shield her high-profile lover from exposure, and gets caught.

Her sentence is to be melachromed; punishment in this society is to turn your skin a bright color to make your shame visible to all, at which point you're an easy target for every nasty-minded person in the vicinity i.

Hannah wakes up fire-engine red, and passes out of respectable society into a halfway house which is probably one of the more evil settings I've ever seen imagined.

The rest of the novel is about how Hannah fights her way into asserting her right to make her own choices. As you would imagine from my short summary, the political overtones are huge and I'm sure this book club to which I am new will spend much time arguing the whethers and should-haves.

It's that sort of book. What I liked most about it was Hannah's increasing consciousness of herself as an independent entity; she is saturated with conservative Christian values yet manages to negotiate the spiritual consequences of her actions and struggle for some kind of redemption without an unrealistic "omg I just totally woke up to the wrongness of things and became a new woman" epiphany.

Secondary characters are plausibly well-rounded and the narrative is clear; I found myself wanting to read just a little bit more and then just a little bit more after that.

My major issue is that I found the ending a little too glib; I could think of several ways I'd want the story to end with more bite. If there had been more tragedy in the end, I think I would have added an extra star, because I like my dystopians dark, dark, dark to make my real world seem just a little bit sweeter.

View 2 comments. Someone told me that my second unpublished novel reminded me of this one, so I thought I'd give it a try.

The premise caught my attention and the writing was smooth and believable. The problem I had with it was that it felt like a political propaganda pamphlet.

I wanted to enjoy the story but I kept getting hit over the head with Jordan's pro-choice agenda. She presents all religious figures as wildly fanatic or absurdly hypocritical, while she turns the back-alley abortionist into some kind o Someone told me that my second unpublished novel reminded me of this one, so I thought I'd give it a try.

She presents all religious figures as wildly fanatic or absurdly hypocritical, while she turns the back-alley abortionist into some kind of Mother Theresa-type hero.

It irked me that she pointed out Salt Lake City as the starting point for the self-righteous fervor that ended in banning abortions.

Not a subtle way to paint Mormons as conservative zealots. But I was willing to overlook that.

I had to admit that as a whole Mormons along with most other Christian religions don't condone convenience abortions.

They feel differently about instances of rape, incest, or perils to the mother's health. I forgave Jordan for singling out the Mormons because I thought it might be nice to see the other side of the argument.

Even if I still believed in the sanctity of life, that didn't mean I couldn't understand where the pro-choicers were coming from, right?

Well, I never got the chance to find out. Jordan offended me so completely and irrevocably with her next stunt: In casual backstory, she mentions that a shooter went on a rampage, killing several people after asking them questions about the Book of Mormon.

If they got the question wrong, he shot them. After reading this listening to it in my car I felt physically sick. Not because it presented a horrible scene, but because this was the second time Jordan had singled out the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and presented them as a cultish, unfeeling group of hypocrites.

Jordan, you are perfectly entitled to hate the LDS church, or any other religion for that matter. But when you write a book to push your warped views and single out a minority group for ridicule it only reveals you as a bigot.

If you ever write a book meant to be enjoyed by all audiences and not just those with the same narrow viewpoint as yourself, please let me know.

Maybe I'll give it a try. I think you'll be surprised by the lack of psychotic, self-righteous murderers. This book is lazy. The most prominent blurb on the back of the book offers this insight "Hillary Jordan channels Nathaniel Hawthorne by way of Margaret Atwood […].

Reflection on the issues raised is mostly replaced with yet another attempted rape. I'm surprised this isn't shelved in young adult based on the reading level.

Melachroming had great potenti This book is lazy. Melachroming had great potential, but the main character can't seem to get out much more than a slow understanding that racism still exists and people are mean to criminals.

Jordan seems to try as hard as possible to let Christianity off the hook for its oppression of women, homosexuals, and anyone who walks "off the path.

This could have been a really good book, but it just doesn't make it. Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

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